Toronto Litho Series 9

TorLithoTranscontinental
A number of postcards from the Toronto Litho Co. Series 9 (as enumerated by Michael J. Smith in his The Canadian Patriotic & Heraldic Postcard Handbook 1897–1945 Volume II), have been added.

Albertype Halifax to New Zealand 1903

AlbertypeHalifaxNZ
This Albertype postcard showing the Old Clock Tower and Citadel in Halifax is postmarked November 2, 1903 to Nelson, New Zealand, where it was received December 17 with a receiving cancel.

Atkinson Bros. Holy Trinity, Winnipeg

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An addition of an Atkinson Bros. pioneer postcard showing an scene of Holy Trinity, Winnipeg Manitoba has been added to the site.

Patriotic Private Postcard

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This example of a pioneer patriotic postcard shows a White Ensign flag on the face. The White Ensign was flown by British Royal Navy ships and shore establishments. The card bears the text ”Private Post Card” and a partially obscured “Stamp Here”, the same text was appeared in the patriotic postcard series made famous by J.C. Wilson & Company of Montreal. While this card appears to be a contemporary of that series with its blank back, the text is in a different font than that used by J.C. Wilson. This card has been postally used much later than its likely date of printing—it bears an Edward VII 1¢ stamp and has been mailed on September 2, 1906 to Danville, Illinois, USA, where it was received September 4th.

McCoy Series 11

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The McCoy listings have been expanded to include a page showing Series 11, the issue commemorating the coronation of King Edward VII in August 1902.

Henry Garner–H.G.L.

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A new page has been added for Henry Garner - Living Picture Post Card Co. (abbreviated H.G.L.) of Leicester, England, who produced a range of postcards in the vicinity of Toronto, in addition to their cards from elsewhere in the world.

Pioneer Postcards with Real Photos

AtkinsonVictoriaRPPC
Real photo postcards began appearing early in the Twentieth Century in Canada, however, prior to the widespread use that came with the availability of affordable cameras for everyday use, professional photographers began producing images which were glued to the faces of printed postcards. A new page has been added to the site showing example of this type of card.

Toronto Litho from Toronto to Tokyo, 1903

TorLithoQuebecTokyo
This Toronto Litho Co. Ltd. pioneer postcard from their Canadian Cities Series illustrating one of the two Quebec City designs has been mailed with a 2¢ QV Numeral stamp from Toronto on April 22, 1903 to Miss Nora von Fallot, at 56 Tsukiji, Tokyo, Japan with a Tokyo receiving cancel dated May 18, 1903, on the reverse.

The reverse of the card contains extensive social history, with the author, Carla, noting that last Wednesday she had seen Sir Oliver Mowat’s funeral procession, and that she attended the Diocese of Toronto Women’s Auxiliary meeting last week, where Miss Cartwright was elected 1st vice president.

Toronto Litho Montreal early use

A new example of Toronto Litho’s Montreal Victoria Bridge design has been added.

This is one of the earlier uses of this series, postally used from Toronto to New York on June 28, 1898. An interesting aspect of this card is that it bears the text “PRIVATE POST CARD” in a purple ink stamp on the face of the card. I’ve often wondered the sequence that Toronto Litho issued the version of the card with the same text printed on the card.

As a conjecture, this could be an example of the second design variation, the first being issued without the text, the second being issued with a rubber stamp of the text, and the third being with the printed text. As the printed text version is scarce, it could be that cards without the text soon became acceptable use through the postal service, and the added text was dropped.

In Allan Steinhart’s “The Postal History of the Post Card in Canada, 1878–1911. He writes that in January 1898, The Official Postal Guide set out the rules for private post cards to foreign destinations, stating:

“…the face should be reserved exclusively for the address and the superscription ‘Private Post Card’.”

While the USA, being the destination of this card, was not considered a foreign destination for the purposes of this regulation, the inclusion of the Private Post Card text on cards would allow a sender greater flexibility in choice of destination.

Canadian View Card Company new series

CVCCMontreal
I’ve added a card from a Canadian View Card Company series previously not catalogued in Mike Smith’s The Canadian Patriotic & Heraldic Postcard Handbook1897–1945. This card is in a familiar CVCC format, but with the text “Greetings from Montreal”. The card has been postally used July 27, 1903, from Riviere Du Loup Stn East to New York.

W.G. MacFarlane Series 8A & 8B

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The listing for W.G. MacFarlane’s patriotic postcard Series 8A & 8B, showing the crest of the Yukon, has been updated.

W.G. MacFarlane Series 10

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The listing for W.G. MacFarlane’s patriotic postcard Series 10, showing Manitoba’s provincial crest, has been expanded, with the addition of an unlisted card, shown at left.

John Walker No. 442

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This postcard by John Walker & Co Ltd. shows a scene of Montreal from Mount Royal, as well as a map of Montreal and its environs. The undiviided back card is not postally used.

W.G. MacFarlane Series 72

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W.G. MacFarlane’s Series 72, with a collection of pull-out scenes in a heavier card stock folder, have been updated to the current site format.

W.G. MarFarlane Series 79

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A new card from W.G. MacFarlane’s Series 79, as listed in Mike Smith’s The W.G. MacFarlane Picture Postcard Handbook 1902–1910 has been added to this site. The card has a very high level of printing quality, includes embossing, and was postally used in 1908.

John Walker No. 441

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This postally unused example of an early twentieth century postcard from John Walker & Co. Ltd. is no. 441, showing a map by J. Bartholomew & Co. with an illustration of Place D’Armes, Montreal.